The Heath & Hampstead Society fights to preserve the wild and natural state of the Heath; to maintain the character and amenities of Hampstead; and to promote the study of local history, natural history and conservation.

An Extraordinary Story

Are trees dangerous?

Society thanks the City for 30 years of caring for the Heath.

The City of London Corporation has been managing and preserving the Heath since 1989. During that time, the Society has been working closely with the City and it was only fitting to host a party to mark that anniversary and honour the relationship. The selection of photographs, courtesy of Diana Von R Photography, and the reprint of the addresses by Society Chair Marc Hutchinson and Karina Dostalova, Chair of the City’s Hampstead Heath Management Committee, recreate the festive ambience from that late summer evening.

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Sheep return to graze on Hampstead Heath

On 27 August sheep will return to Hampstead Heath to graze for the first time since the 1950s as part of a week-long trial.

The flock of five sheep, provided by Mudchute Park & Farm, are made up of Oxford Down and Norfolk Horn. They will graze at The Tumulus on the Heath, an ancient Roman monument managed by Historic England. Fencing has been installed at The Tumulus to protect the sheep who will be kept securely at the Heath’s nearby Kenwood Yard overnight.

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Shepherds in action

Watch The Society welcome the sheep!

Society objects to conversion of police station into school

7 reasons why we are objecting again. Download as PDF or

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How Hampstead Heath was Saved – a story of people power by Helen Lawrence

published by Camden History Society with the support of the Heath & Hampstead Society. The book can be bought from Camden History Society’s website.

“This book shows what can be achieved – Helen Lawrence has a fascinating story to tell.”
Griff Rhys Jones

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Society battles to save Heath plot from development.

Land left by Harry Hallowes, the so-called Hermit of Hampstead Heath, is in danger of being bought by developers. The charities to whom Harry left the land that he squatted for twenty years have decided to auction it to the highest bidder. Despite Harry’s known wishes that the land be left in its wild and natural state.

Harry’s plot is completely surrounded by the Heath. The Society is bitterly disappointed that the vendors of the plot have rejected a generous purchase offer made by the City of London, financially supported by the Society. Although strict covenants and planning laws prevent the plot being used except as a garden, there is always a risk that, if the land remains in private hands, it will become subject to attempted development, greatly to the detriment of the surrounding Heath.

The Society regards the plot as a natural part of the Heath, and feels very strongly that it should be publicly enjoyed as part of the Heath proper.